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Have you ever seen a hermit crab without a shell on? This little guy washed in after some rough weather and somehow lost his shell. You can see that their body doesn't look much like a true crab at all. Their abdomen forms a tail that curls up much likes a shrimp's tail. Their abdomen is also very soft so they borrow empty snail shells to live in. As they grow they need to exchange this shell for a bigger one. Luckily we were able to give this guy a new shell and he seems much happier!
Seaside Aquarium
This beautiful, saw-whet owl came to us with what appeared to be a broken wing. It will be taken to the Wildlife Center of the North Coast for further evaluation, treatment, and love! Good luck little buddy. The northern saw-whet owl (Aegolius acadicus) is the most common owl found in forests across North America. Those that live in forests near the coastline have been seen feeding on marine invertebrates such as amphipods and isopods.
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This year's first Treasure the Beach event was a success. Thank you to everyone who showed up and helped clean the beach. With your help we were able to remove 80 pounds of trash from the beach! Join us Saturday, February 2nd for the next beach clean up.
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Treasure the Beach is tomorrow morning from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Pick up your SOLVE bags and gloves in front of the Seashore Inn. Thank you for helping keep Seaside's beach clean and safe for everyone!
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New year, new crabbing season. Stay safe out there friends!
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The winter whale migration is underway! Tomorrow's forecast calls for little wind and no rain, a perfect (and most likely only) day to look for these migrating whales this week. Some of the best places to catch a glimpses of these traveling giants are at Ecola State Park, Silver Point, Cape Falcon, and Neahkahnie Mountain.
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Some of the biggest tides of the year this weekend are combined with extremely large surf. Be safe on the beaches and keep an eye out for marine life along the tide line. We found these very small skin breathing sea cucumbers (Leptosynapta Clark) which were unearthed by the tide and surf. They're not like most other sea cucumbers, as they have no tube feet or respiratory tree. Instead, oxygen is exchanged through their body wall, hence the name skin breathing sea cucumbers. This particular species is found all over the Pacific Northwest, from British Columbia down to California and even Mexico. They are born in the springtime and immediately burrow into the sediment. By around August they reach their full size of about 1.3 inches in length. They are part of the echinoderm family, which makes them related to sea stars, sea urchins, sand dollars, and brittle stars, however, being relatives doesn't necessarily make them a happy family. Their biggest predators are sun stars.
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Next time you pass by bull kelp, you might want to take a closer look...Storms, high winds and violent currents may cause kelp to be ripped up from the sea floor. Strong wave action tangles the kelp, which eventually washes up on the beach in enormous knots.
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It's a little windy on the coast today! https://youtu.be/IogaAd6JeCY
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The storm has passed! The surf is still big, be careful on the beach.
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There is a high surf, high wind warning for the northern Oregon coast today. Be safe and watch out for sneaker waves! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mmiv-TUf57E
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2019 tide tables are finally here! Now if we could only go clamming...
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We have had some whale action on the northern Oregon Coast! Sunday and Monday a couple humpback whales were spotted feeding near Silver Point along with thousands of birds and a handful of rafting California sea lions. Thanks to the beautiful weather and calm surf it they were easily spotted by land. Humpback whales endure the longest migration route of any mammal. The longest recorded migration was that of seven Humpback Whales, including one calf. They traveled 5,160 miles, from Costa Rica to Antarctica! And although the Humpbacks seen along the Oregon Coast travel a mere 3,000 miles between their feeding and breeding grounds they have been known to complete this epic journey in as little as 36 days.
Seaside Aquarium
Have you ever seen a hooded nudibranch? This mesmerizing sea slug attaches itself to smooth rocks and seaweed. Once securely attached, the hooded nudibranch begins to feed. It resembles a Venus fly trap, with it’s mouth wide open waiting patiently for prey. Unfortunate zooplankton which ventures too close is swallowed whole.
Seaside Aquarium
Our little grunt sculpin is growing up! These funny looking sculpins hop around on their large pectoral fins and take refuge in empty barnacle shells. Their unique face masks them from predators which are tricked into thinking that they are just barnacles.
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A pale beach hopper (Megalorchestia columbiana) rests in seagrass. This amphipod can be found in large numbers or wondering the tide line all alone. They play an important role in breaking down algae and other detritus that washes ashore. There are many different species of marine amphipods which are referred to as "beach hoppers" or "sand flees" some bite, some do not. Lucky for us, this one doesn't bite.
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We have been inundated with good weather lately. Don't worry, we are not complaining😉. If you haven't gotten out to see the sunset lately tonight's the night!
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Look what the tide has brought in...moon jellies! This species of jellyfish ranges from Alaska to California, and is the proverbial “drifter”, as it floats along where ever the ocean’s current takes it. They eat tiny marine life such as plankton and diatoms, which they pick up with the tiny hair like tentacles that lace the outside edge of the jellyfish. Though they sting their prey, us large thick skinned humans can not be harmed by this jelly.
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Frosty morning on the beach...winter is on its way!
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The skies are blue and the surf is big! Be careful on the beaches, this type of surf can generate sneaker waves. What is a sneaker wave? Sneaker waves are sudden, unexpected waves that reach farther onto land than normal waves. They're called sneaker waves because they occur with zero warning. They may surge far onto the beach with deadly force, and are impossible to predict. Sneaker waves also carry large amounts of sand, which can saturate your clothes and weigh you down, making escape from their undertow difficult, if not impossible. There are various ocean conditions which can manufacture sneaker waves. In the Pacific Northwest, we have one of the highest wave-energy levels in the world. This means that our sneaker waves are often produced by offshore storms, which interact with the already high surf. Winter storms can induce sneaker waves that run up the beach 50 yards or more. How to play it safe: *Never turn your back on the ocean. *Visually note how far the ocean has previously come by spotting the divide between wet and dry sand, and then stay on the dry sand. *Do not play on logs or large pieces of driftwood near the tide line!
Seaside Aquarium
Taking a closer look at the eel grass on the beach.... Walking along the shore you may have come across seaweed or some sort of seagrass. Have you ever taken a closer look? If not, you may have missed out. This small tuft of eel grass had hundreds of tiny porcelain crabs clinging to its roots. If returned to the ocean the tide would simply wash them back onto shore, where they would perish. We will use the eel grass for our pipefish to hide in and the crabs will be placed in a protective tank where they can grow. If all goes well, when they are large enough to be released without washing back onto the sandy beach, we will release them.
Seaside Aquarium
While perusing the beach for newly washed up kelp, to feed to our sea urchins, we came across an interesting find, a juvenile Mola mola. Mola molas, more commonly referred to as ocean sunfish, are more prevalent in tropical waters but when winds and ocean currents bring warmer water toward the Oregon coast they venture further north and can be see feeding off of Neahkahnie Mountain. Fully grown,this fish can weight over 2,200 pounds, making it the heaviest bony fish in the ocean. Another interesting fact about this strange looking fish is that females are able to produce 300,000,000 eggs, more than any other known vertebrate. The same currents that bring the Mola molas to Oregon can also bring sea turtles. As we enter into Oregon's sea turtle season (November through February), keep a close eye out for cold-stunned sea turtles. If you do come across a sea turtle on one of our beaches, please call the Seaside Aquarium at 503-738-6211. The quicker we can get them off the beach and into a stable environment the more likely they are able to be rehabbed and released back into the ocean.
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A beautiful King Fisher came to the Seaside Aquarium today. In need of some TLC, it is now on it's way to the Wildlife Center of the North Coast. Good luck little buddy!💕 #wildlifecenterofthenorthcoast #wildlife #kingfisher #seasideaquarium #oregoncoast #pacificnorthwest #seasideoregon
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Join us tomorrow at Pizza Harbor as we celebrate Seaside's Halloween Happenin's. Haunted touch tanks will be set up from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Come on over and learn about the creepy crawlies leaving beneath the surface of the Pacific Ocean. For more information on this free family event visit; https://www.seasideor.com/event/halloween-happenins-seaside
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Seaside Aquarium, 200 North Prom, Seaside, Oregon 97138 Tel: (503) 738-6211.