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SEASIDE AQUARIUM

FEED THE SEALS

CELEBRATE THE 80TH ANNIVERSARY!

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Officially summer!
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Anemones are absolutely fascinating! The Giant plumose anemones can defend themselves by the means of acontia, threadlike structures lined with nematocysts (stinging cells). When disturbed, the anemone will shoot out acontia from its body wall or mouth, stinging anything the acontia comes in contact with.
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It's no secret, here at the Seaside Aquarium, we absolutely love our octopuses! This gorgeous girl loves to gorge herself on fresh bay clams. So once a week we personally go clamming, just for her. What can we say, this one has us wrapped around her tenticles!💞🐙
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This squat lobster is full of personality, we just love him! #Mr.sassypants
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Great glimpse of mamma caring for her eggs! Enjoy (we apologize for the audio).
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Kitty meets 🐙!
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We will be spending the day down at Kelly's Brighton Marina raising money for the Mudd Nick Foundation! Come on down, you might be the lucky one who catches the $1,000 crab!
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What a beautiful bird, thanks Josh and crew for taking this guy in!
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We were asked to help out with a juvenile pelican who was perched in a small tree outside of the Carousel Mall in the middle of downtown Seaside. Please remember, if you see a distressed bird give it space and call the Wildlife Center of the North Coast, 503-338-0331.
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Mamma octo and her eggs!
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7GxQPafnj4o
Seaside Aquarium
Visitors to the Long Beach peninsula got the rare chance to see a small Minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) washing ashore. The whale had died long before washing in and had been drifting out at sea for some time. Long enough in fact, that due to decomposition, gasses started to build up inside of the animal. Once the animal hit the beach the pressure from the gasses, combined with the immense weight of the animal, pushed its diaphragm outside of its mouth (this is what you are seeing in the photographs). A team from Portland State University and the Seaside Aquarium will gather together on Wednesday morning to preform a necropsy.
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What a gorgeous day to celebrate our 80th!
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Tomorrow is the big day, the big 8 'O'! Hope to see you all at our celebration; 1937-2017!
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All of the migratory shorebirds are enjoying this year's bounty of mole crabs. It has been quite the treat to watch.
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Harbor seal pups have been popping up everywhere! Please give them space to rest; In Oregon, the breeding season for harbor seals begins in mid-April which corresponds with the season’s first harbor seal pups showing up on Oregon’s beaches. The pups weigh about 25 pounds at birth, but they grow quickly, doubling their weight within the first month. The mother’s milk is about 40% fat, so she must forage for food as often as possible to keep her energy up and provide for her pup. While she is in search of food, she will leave her pup to rest on the beach (like all newborn babies, seal pups need a lot of sleep). Though you may not be able to see her, she is always nearby. Well-intentioned people sometimes think that a seal pup alone on the beach has been abandoned by its mother, but this is rarely the case. If the pup is moved, it has no chance of reuniting with its mother. If you see a seal pup on the beach, give it plenty of space and leave it alone. On the Northern Oregon Coast you can call the Seaside Aquarium at (503) 738-6211 and someone will post signs around the pup encouraging everyone to stay away. If you are elsewhere, you can contact the Marine Mammal Stranding Network Hotline at 541-270-6830.
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One week left until our 80th and we can't wait! Check out these historic building photographs of the natatorium, circa 1924 and the Aquarium, circa 1940. Come on down, we will take you on a marine adventure, circa 1937!
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Someone left us a present and we love it!! Thank you!
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A big thank you, to the state park's crew at Fort Stevens, for helping us keep this little fur seal safe! Remember if you see a live marine mammal on the beach, keep your distance so that the animal can rest without feeling threatened 😍.
Seaside Aquarium
Check out these nudibranch eggs under a microscope, so much movement! Nudibranchs are hermaphroditic, thus have a set of reproductive organs for both sexes, but they cannot fertilize themselves. They lay strings of pink or white egg capsules that are pinched at intervals, looking like sausage links. After about a week they hatch into veliger larvae, which bear a ciliated swimming organ called the velum. The veligers enter the plankton and spend quite some time there before metamorphosing, into tiny versions of the mature animals.
Seaside Aquarium
Some more fun with eggs! Our nudibranchs are laying eggs too, here is a closer look! Nudibranchs are hermaphroditic, thus have a set of reproductive organs for both sexes, but they cannot fertilize themselves. They lay strings of pink or white egg capsules that are pinched at intervals, looking like sausage links. After about a week they hatch into veliger larvae, which bear a ciliated swimming organ called the velum. The veligers enter the plankton and spend quite some time there before metamorphosing, into tiny versions of the mature animals. Stay tuned for a quick video showing what goes on inside of the eggs before they hatch.
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Looking for something to occupy your time this summer? Consider volunteering for the Haystack Rock Awareness Program. Great people, doing great things!
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An very quick clip of the movement/changes going on through the process of mitoses in newly fertilized sea star eggs. Pay close attention to the fertilized sea star egg in the upper left corner. It is subtle but it is there!
Seaside Aquarium
Fun with sea stars! Our sea stars in our touch tank started spawning yesterday afternoon. Today we thought we would take a little closer look at what was going on, enjoy!
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Seaside Aquarium, 200 North Prom, Seaside, Oregon 97138 Tel: (503) 738-6211.